Neuroscience,

Juggling increases brain power

The volunteers were taught to juggle with three balls
Complex tasks such as juggling produce significant changes to the structure of the brain, according to scientists at Oxford University.
In the journal, Nature Neuroscience, the scientists say they saw a 5% increase in white matter - the cabling network of the brain.
The people who took part in the study were trained for six weeks and had brain scans before and after.
Long term it could aid treatments for diseases like multiple sclerosis.

Diffusion MRI

Brain Needs 3D to Remember Faces

ScienceDaily (Sep. 10, 2010) — In our dynamic 3-D world, we can encounter a familiar face from any angle and still recognize that face with ease, even if the person has, for example, changed his hair style. This is because our brain has used the 2-D snapshots perceived by our eyes (like a camera) to build and store a 3-D mental representation of the face, which is resilient to such changes.

The evolution of Meeting Formats, the rebirth of the Campfire Meeting

Long ago we had meetings around a campfire. A small group of people in a circle, listening to stories, debating, conversing, learning from each other.
Much later, in more recent ages, only the rich and powerful could talk to larger groups, armies and other audiences.
And even more recently, thanks to sound equipment, we all can afford to address a public, larger than the campfire crowd.

Spending Time in Nature Makes People Feel More Alive

ScienceDaily (June 4, 2010) — Feeling sluggish? The solution may require getting outside the box -- that big brick-and-mortar box called a building.

Being outside in nature makes people feel more alive, finds a series of studies published in the June 2010 issue of the Journal of Environmental Psychology. And that sense of increased vitality exists above and beyond the energizing effects of physical activity and social interaction that are often associated with our forays into the natural world, the studies show.

Wash Away Your Doubts When You Wash Your Hands

Wash Away Your Doubts When You Wash Your Hands

ScienceDaily (May 7, 2010)

That's the key finding of a University of Michigan study published in the current (May 7) issue of Science.

The study, conducted by U-M psychologists Spike W. S. Lee and Norbert Schwarz, expands on past research by showing that hand-washing does more than remove the guilt of past misdeeds.

Emotions, Learning and Education

Summary Report from an OECD-CER Meeting, Copenhagen, Denmark

As there are 34 000 classified emotions, the question arises as to how are teachers supposed to recognize and deal with the emotional states of their students, when most of the time the students don’t even know what they are feeling themselves.....
Is it possible to develop a coherent framework for dealing with emotions that does not produce confusion?

SPEAKER: John Medina

John Medina has the rare gift of making science fun and accessible to business leaders. He is an extraordinary speaker -- perhaps one of the most energetic and engaging speakers you will ever encounter. And he has a message that every leader needs to survive and thrive at work.

In a keynote presentation or dynamic workshop, Medina guides you through his 12 Brain Rules, things you should know about how the brain works. With fascinating stories and his characteristic sense of humor, he'll explain:

Right-Handed and Left-Handed People Do Not See the Same Bright Side of Things

ScienceDaily (Feb. 2, 2010) — Despite the common association of "right" with life, correctness, positiveness and good things, and "left" with death, clumsiness, negativity and bad things, recent research shows that most left-handed people hold the opposite association. Thus, left-handers become an interesting case in which conceptual associations as a result of a sensory-motor experience, and conceptual associations that rely on linguistic and cultural norms, are contradictory.

Relaxation increases energy and focus

Relaxation increases energy and focus

When stress is out-of-control, it can get in the way of your ability to:

* Think clearly and creatively
* Communicate clearly
* Accurately “read” other people
* Hear what someone is really saying
* Trust others
* Attend to your own needs

How Music 'Moves' Us: Listeners' Brains Second-Guess the Composer

 ScienceDaily (Jan. 16, 2010) — Have you ever accidentally pulled your headphone socket out while listening to music? What happens when the music stops? Psychologists believe that our brains continuously predict what is going to happen next in a piece of music. So, when the music stops, your brain may still have expectations about what should happen next.

Brain Rules

The brain is an amazing thing. Most of us have no idea what’s really going on inside our heads. Yet brain scientists have uncovered details every business leader, parent, and teacher should know.

How do we learn? What exactly do sleep and stress do to our brains? Why is multi-tasking a myth? Why is it so easy to forget—and so important to repeat new knowledge?

Brain Rules is about what we know for sure, and what we might do about it.

Genetic Basis Of Musical Aptitude: Neurobiology Of Musicality Related To Intrinsic Attachment Behavior

 ScienceDaily (May 27, 2009) — Music is social communication between individuals -- humming of lullabies attach infant to parent and singing or playing music adds croup cohesion. The neurobiology of music perception and production is likely to be related to the pathways affecting intrinsic attachment behavior, suggests a recent Finnish study.

League Of Rock :: Music-Based Team Building

 Music-Based Team Building

 Does Your Team Need To Be Tuned?

Jumpstart Creativity & Teamwork! Get a direct line to your staff while they are at play + at WORK with music-based team building corporate events, rewards + incentives programs.

Get your team truly connected by combining the universallanguage of music with the excitement of Rock‘N' Roll!

Stop And Smell The Flowers -- The Scent Really Can Soothe Stress

ScienceDaily (July 23, 2009) — Feeling stressed? Then try savoring the scent of lemon, mango, lavender, or other fragrant plants. Scientists in Japan are reporting the first scientific evidence that inhaling certain fragrances alter gene activity and blood chemistry in ways that can reduce stress levels.
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