Neuroscience,

Stop And Smell The Flowers -- The Scent Really Can Soothe Stress

ScienceDaily (July 23, 2009) — Feeling stressed? Then try savoring the scent of lemon, mango, lavender, or other fragrant plants. Scientists in Japan are reporting the first scientific evidence that inhaling certain fragrances alter gene activity and blood chemistry in ways that can reduce stress levels.

Older Adults Less Affected By Sleep Deprivation Than Younger Adults During Cognitive Performance


ScienceDaily (June 15, 2009) — Older adults are able to retain better cognitive functioning during sleep deprivation than young adults, according to a research abstract that will be presented on Wednesday, June 10, at SLEEP 2009, the 23rd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies.

The Medici Effect

What do termites and architecture have in common?
Music records and airlines?
And what does any of this have to do with
health-care, card-games or cooking ?

Most of us would assume nothing. But out of each of these seemingly random combinations have come groundbreaking ideas that have created whole new fields. In his bestselling book, Frans Johansson takes us on a fascinating journey to the Intersection: a place where ideas from different industries and cultures meet and collide, ultimately igniting an explosion of extraordinary new innovations.

Cognitive Training Can Alter Biochemistry Of The Brain

ScienceDaily  — Researchers at the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet have shown for the first time that the active training of the working memory brings about visible changes in the number of dopamine receptors in the human brain. The study, which is published in the journal Science, was conducted with the help of PET scanning and provides deeper insight into the complex interplay between cognition and the brain's biological structure.

Why Sleep Is Needed To Form Memories

ScienceDaily — If you ever argued with your mother when she told you to get some sleep after studying for an exam instead of pulling an all-nighter, you owe her an apology, because it turns out she's right. And now, scientists are beginning to understand why.

In research published recently in Neuron, Marcos Frank, PhD, Assistant Professor of Neuroscience, at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, postdoctoral researcher Sara Aton, PhD, and colleagues describe for the first time how cellular changes in the sleeping brain promote the formation of memories.

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